Resources

IPCC in Haiku

The entire IPCC report in 19 illustrated haiku: An oceanographer's work of art that doubles as powerful talking points and a visual guide to the main messages of the 5th Assessment Report.

C.L.E.A.N.

This site provides a guide to teaching climate science, as well as scientifically and pedagogically reviewed digital resources (labs and activities for a range of students) for teaching about climate and energy.

National Academies Resources for Teachers

Includes resource kits for teachers, videos, site recommendations, and more, all vetted and approved by the National Academy of Sciences.

Climate Communication Videos

These videos, created by Climate Communication, animate and explain the science behind climate change, potential impacts, and what we can do going forward.

The Four Big Questions of Global Warming

Bill Blakemore speaks with Science Director Richard Somerville on the four big questions of global warming.

ABC News, 2010

The Scientific Case for Urgent Action to Limit Climate Change

Richard Somerville gave the 4th Annual Charles David Keeling Memorial Lecture at Scripps Institution of Oceanography, UCSD.

March 11, 2013

What’s causing unusually hot temperatures in the U.S.?

Science Advisor Kevin Trenberth was interviewed by Judy Woodruff on Newshour. He spoke about recent extreme heat and its impacts, and the connection to climate change.

PBS, July 2012

Telling the Climate Change Story (Woods Hole)

Susan Hassol addressed framing, psychological and cultural issues, and questions involving language in this talk on climate communication.

Woods Hole Research Center & Marine Biological Lab, May 2012

Telling the Climate Change Story (U of Arizona)

As plenary speaker at EarthWeek 2012, Susan Hassol discussed the gap in public understanding of climate change, and how scientists can improve their communication.

University of Arizona, April 2012

National Climate Assessment

The most comprehensive and accessible report to date on the impacts of climate change in the U.S. finds that global warming is unequivocal, primarily human-induced, and its impacts are already apparent across our nation.

2009
Download 196 pages, 13.7MB

NREL/MIT on the potential for renewable energy in US

This visualization shows how the U.S. could potentially be powered mainly by renewables by 2050.

National Renewable Energy Laboratory

Weather on Steroids

AtmosNews takes a lighthearted look at why some people call carbon dioxide (and the other greenhouse gases) the steroids of the climate system. NCAR scientist Gerald "Jerry" Meehl narrates this playful video.

UCAR

Too Hot Not To Handle

Susan Hassol wrote this documentary, selecting stories and scientists to best convey the impacts of climate change on Americans and communicate the variety of solutions already underway to address the climate challenge.

HBO, 2006

Impacts of a Warming Arctic

The Arctic Climate Impact Assessment is an evaluation of Arctic climate change and its impacts for the region and the world. This synthesis report makes the findings accessible to policy makers and the public.

2004
Download 146 pages, 15.4MB

EPA Global Climate Change Website

This site allows kids to explore the causes and impacts of climate change, along with ideas for solutions. Fun and interactive (videos, graphics, games), this is ideal for a younger audience.

Climate Insights 101

Geared to middle to high school students, these modules are teaching aids on the basics of climate science. There are modules of a couple of minutes, and longer ones of up to 20 minutes. Each is followed by an optional quiz.

IPCC Frequently Asked Questions

In 2007, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change included these FAQs in an effort to make the basics of climate science more accessible to non-scientists. Susan Hassol worked with the authors to edit this piece.

2007
Download 34 pages, 8.8MB

Communicating the Science of Climate Change

This article addresses issues of language, framing, and other aspects of how scientists can be more effective in communicating climate change.

Richard Somerville & Susan Hassol, Physics Today, October 2011
Download 6 pages, 1.5Mb

Improving How Scientists Communicate Climate Change

This article discusses some of the problems with how climate scientists communicate and offers practical suggestions for improvement.

Susan Hassol, Eos, March 2008
Download 2 pages, 83KB

Climate Change, Irreversibility, Urgency

Richard Somerville argues that a failure to reduce carbon dioxide emissions significantly within the next decade will have large adverse effects on the climate that will... read more

Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists, August 2012

NASA Climate Website

This award-winning site includes well-presented data, visualizations, and resources for children, educators, and students.

NOAA’s National Climatic Data Center

NOAA's National Climatic Data Center is the world's largest repository of climate data.

climate.gov

This NOAA climate website includes a variety of resources including a series of videos featuring Deke Arndt, Chief of the Climate Monitoring Branch at NOAA's National Climatic Data Center.

George Mason Center for Climate Change Communication

Yale and George Mason work together to produce some of the most comprehensive reports on the American public’s perceptions of climate change including their “Six Americas” work.

Yale Project on Climate Change Communication

Yale and George Mason work together to produce some of the most comprehensive reports on the American public’s perceptions of climate change including their “Six Americas” work.

Climate Central

An independent organization of scientists and journalists who research and report on climate change and its impacts.

Earth the Operator’s Manual

This series hosted by glaciologist Richard Alley includes three one-hour specials about climate change and sustainable energy. The website provides a great set of additional resources.

NASA’s Climate Kids Page

A great resource for children and young students that includes information modules, interactives, and image galleries and activities teachers can utilize. 

127 years of warming in 26 seconds

NASA produced this animation illustrating planetary warming from 1884 through 2011.

NASA

Real Climate

A commentary site on climate science by working climate scientists for the interested public & journalists. The site aims to provide a quick response to developing stories and provide context sometimes missing in mainstream commentary.

Skeptical Science

This website offers clear responses to all the typical contrarian arguments.

Climate Progress

Edited by Joe Romm, Climate Progress covers climate science, solutions, and politics. New York Times columnist Tom Friedman calls it "the indispensable blog" and Time magazine named it one of the 25 "Best Blogs of 2010."

Arctic Climate Feedbacks: Global Implications

This report assesses of the latest science on Arctic feedbacks and their implications beyond the Arctic. Edited by Susan Hassol and Martin Sommerkorn and written by an international team of scientists.

2009
Download 100 pages, 11.4 MB

Weather and Climate Extremes in a Changing Climate

As one of its series of 21 synthesis and assessment reports, the U.S. Climate Change Science Program published a report in June 2008 on Weather and Climate Extremes in a Changing Climate.

2008
Download 180 pages, 9.4 MB

Communicating Climate Change

This interview by NASA JPL's Sharon Ray provides an in-depth discussion of Susan Hassol’s ideas and motivations.

NASA JPL Center for Climate Sciences, May 2011

AAAS: What We Know

The What We Know Initiative aims to educate the public on climate change "Risk, Reality, and Response." It includes a short report of main messages, and videos where experts discuss the facts of climate change.